Movie Review from Fashion Lane: Suicide Squad ✍🏽

Suicide Squad: 

  1. It left me wanting more.
  2. I wanted to know more background info about each character.
  3. Harlequin is the breakout star.
  4. They are awesome as a complete package. 
  5. I can’t wait for the sequel. 

Pushing through Parenthood with children on the Autism Spectrum 👪

  • If you don’t know by know, a lot of my inspiration comes from my life experiences. 
  • It is therapeutic for me and I hope reading these will give you your Ah! Moment🔜
  • Today is the 1st day back for teachers. Last week was crazy. Lambchop (our son) had 2 meltdowns on me……He wanted a break from me and I was sad about it😒

Lambchop has Autism. He’s almost seven years old. I am a veteran special education teacher. Most people believe it’s easier, when you have that title. It’s a conundrum, quite frankly. I have not met a parent of a child with Autism, who is also a special education teacher. Most times I feel isolated by it. The rest of the time I wear it as a badge of honor. 
God chose me to parent this beautiful soul, when he knew I was teaching children with Autism. God has a sense of humor😉 He knew the road I was traveling to become a special education teacher years before our son was born. He was preparing me. 

So…..my Husband took over Sunday, so I could run out for school supplies, etc. Saturday was my calming effect from earlier that week. This weekend was crazy busy. Next weekend will be calmer, I’m claiming it💞

Parenthood is not a spectators sport; it’s a long triathlon! It’s wonderful to have a spouse who can hold your hand through it all💙👪

What can you do when your overwhelmed by a task or circumstance?

  1. Remember it is just a wrinkle in time.
  2. God will iron those wrinkles out.
  3. Ask for help!
  4. Rome wasn’t built in a day.
  5. God created the heavens and earth in seven days. 
  6. don’t panic about what you cannot accomplish in one day. 
  7. ⚜Remember! Practice makes perfect. 

xoxo,

Lioness Stargazer 💞

Kid meltdown; working through mommyhood😒

Today, was my day! 

  • Kid had a meltdown cause husband playing catch me & kids wasn’t done having fun. 
  • Kid has to go to camp. Dad must go to work. 
  • Me: thinking: this is gonna end bad! 
  • Dad forgot the rules of the house. 
  • Pack kid up and leave quickly. But! Nooooo! He just had to have playtime @ 7:30am. 
  • Thus, leaving me to deal with the meltdown.
  • I’m driving signing to him. I need help and he smiles and takes off. 
  • After I’ve been kicked in the back and shoulder for the next 30 minutes. I send him a long text…….
  • He responded, “I’m sorry. I though you were telling me he was crying🤔😒🙅🏾
  • I didn’t even respond back! It was not worth me getting angry again. 
  • Camp is over and we’re waiting for the next camp session. 
  • My shoulder and back feels like mush🤕
  • We’re riding in the front this time and playing classical kids songs for pre school. 
  • He: son, has been eating and drinking like this morning never happened. 
  • Me: writing this blog post! 

I’m the Special Education Teacher, so I guess I have everything under control?🙃🙃🙃🔜

Other Blog post: Helping children through meltdowns👁👪

⚜In my field, kids have meltdowns frequently. What happens to kids during this stressful time? They lose complete control over their emotions for whatever reason they are faced with. The main thing to understand is kids are learning. They have not mastered the art of social skills. The art of controlling their emotions isn’t fully developed at this time. 

Keep in mind, kids will have meltdown until junior high school. For kids with developmental disabilities, Autism, Aspergers Syndrome, etc, this can be a life time event. What can you do? 

  1. Help the child identify why they are upset?
  2. Work with the child to calm down. 
  3. Use calming words. 
  4. Stay alert of your surroundings
  5. Maintain a safe but loving space so the kids doesn’t attack you or others. 
  6. Keep a safe toy of item for the child, kids have favorite things that always calm them (blanket, toy, ipad). 
  7. Call parents or family members who are the cool down person or favorite person for the child.  
  8. Remind the child that they are not in trouble and have done nothing wrong.
  9. Keep warm eye contact. 
  10. Chart, record the event, remember that triggered the meltdown and work on not letting the triggering action happen again. 
  11. Draw, color or journal with the child why they were feeling the emotion & what can happen to improve it. 

These are all restorative practices to help the child see the issue and find a path back to the cool zone. Remember! Practice makes perfect! 

xoxo, 
Lioness Stargazer 💞